Category: Ian Bremmer

From TIME:

No foreign policy question loomed larger during the bitter presidential campaign than U.S. relations with Russia. Hillary Clinton painted Russian President Vladimir Putin as an aggressive autocrat who threatens U.S. national security, while Donald Trump treated him as a strong and decisive leader with whom Washington could do business. Putin, a Soviet man from head to toe, has always chafed at what he sees as U.S. post–Cold War triumphalism. He has never welcomed claims by Americans that the U.S. is an indispensable and exceptional nation with a responsibility to promote Western values everywhere, including across Russia’s neighborhood and inside Russia itself. Putin likes Trump in part because he believes that the new President has no interest in asserting that privilege.

Read the rest of Ian‘s column here.

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From Time:

Fidel is dead, and now, buried. Some will call him the last of the Cold Warriors. But there are still plenty of regimes that have been in power for decades. Are they frozen in time, or is change bubbling beneath the surface? In each case, the answer may depend on how long political power can be kept within the family. A look at five of the longest-ruling regimes in the world, and where they go from here.

Read Ian’s entire column here.

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From Time:

There are far too few examples of good government these days. That’s why Peru, a small commodity-driven economy with an already accomplished new President, deserves more of the world’s attention. Since taking office in July, Pedro Pablo Kuczynski, an economist and technocrat uninterested in political ideology, has advanced reform with real support from an opposition-led legislature, in part because he has focused on investments that can directly improve the lives of ordinary people. “If we reduce crime, take strong anticorruption measures, reactivate our economy and invest in quality health, education and basic infrastructure,” he assured me during a recent interview, “people will see that favorably.”

Read Ian’s entire column here.

From Time:

It was unthinkable until it happened. On January 20, Donald J. Trump will take over as President of the United States. The impact of his coming presidency is just being felt in the U.S.—but the rest of the world will need to adjust to a President Trump as well. That won’t be easy—Trump campaigned on overturning some of the most basic assumptions about U.S. foreign policy, from the importance of multilateral alliances like NATO to the importance of keeping a strong front against a resurgent Russia.

So what will it be be like? What should the friends and enemies of the U.S. expect? In this video, TIME foreign affairs columnist Ian Bremmer offers a guide to a world change—Trump’s America in the world. It won’t be like you expect.

Watch Ian’s video here.

From Time:

Donald Trump’s foreign policy? Still up in the air at this point. With Hillary Clinton, we would have known exactly what we were getting. That was her biggest selling point—and a big part of the problem. But Trump is the ultimate black box. Much of this was by design—making America great again was always about America itself, allies and enemies be damned. That makes for an effective political pitch, but it’s a wholly unrealistic governing philosophy for a person whose main responsibility is to navigate the country through choppy geopolitical waters.

Read Ian’s entire column here.

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