Category: The Washington Post

From The Washington Post:

A joke among journalists is that we are taught to count: “one, two, trend.” But at this point, I think it’s fair to say that we are witnessing a populist trend around the world. The real question is, what is fueling its extraordinary rise?

Almost a month after Donald Trump’s election, Europeans went to the polls, with mixed results. Italians voted against everything — the establishment, the European Union and, by extension, their centrist, reform-minded prime minister, Matteo Renzi. Austrian voters, by contrast, rejected far-right candidate Norbert Hofer. But it was still startling that his Freedom Party — whose first leader was a former Nazi minister and SS member — received 46 percent of the national vote. Over the past few years, almost everywhere in Europe — including France, the Netherlands and Germany — right-wing populist parties have gained ground.

Read Fareed‘s entire column here.

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From The Washington Post:

Among the reasons #NeverTrump Republicans opposed Donald Trump’s election was that his lack of conservative principles and ethical stands would inevitably corrupt, intellectually and morally, the GOP. Republicans would feel compelled to defend anti-free-market and anti-democratic moves. They’d wind up as apologists for behavior and policies they would never have tolerated in a Democratic administration. This has happened already, and the president-elect hasn’t even finished picking his Cabinet.

On the ethical front, the Republicans remain mute about Trump’s ongoing morass of conflicts, the mixing of private and public interests and the unwillingness to recognize that his foreign holdings pose a constitutional problem.

Read the rest of Jennifer’s post here.

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From The Washington Post:

The word “inappropriate” is increasingly used inappropriately. It is useful to describe departures from good manners and other social norms, such as wearing white after Labor Day and using the salad fork with the entree. But the adjective has become a splatter of verbal fudge, a weasel word falsely suggesting measured seriousness. Its misty imprecision does not disguise but advertises the user’s moral obtuseness.

A French court has demonstrated how “inappropriate” can be an all-purpose device of intellectual evasion and moral cowardice. The court said it is inappropriate to do something that might disturb people who killed their unborn babies for reasons that were, shall we say, inappropriate.

Read the rest of George’s column here.

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From The Washington Post:

As Democrats contemplate their losses in November’s election, most have settled on a solution. They believe that the party needs more economically populist policies. But this misses an essential reality: Most people don’t vote on the basis of policies.

There is excellent research by political scientists and psychologists on why people vote. The conclusion is clear. As Gabriel Lenz writes in his landmark 2012 book, “Follow the Leader?”, “Voters don’t choose between politicians based on policy stances; rather, voters appear to adopt the policies that their favorite politicians prefer.”

Read the rest of Fareed’s column here.

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From The Washington Post:

Professional politicians, think-tankers and pundits have the wacky notion that candidates tell voters what they intend to do and voters choose the candidate whose plans they like the best. That happens to be the premise of representative democracy and the basis for much of political advertising, speechmaking and polling. The problem is that it appears not to be a realistic assessment of modern politics.

President-elect Donald Trump’s key campaign issues — protectionism, mass deportation and repealing Obamacare — do not appear to be in the cards. In some cases, voters would be delighted to see Trump abandon his campaign promises.

Read the rest of Jennifer’s post here.

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