From The Daily Beast:

In 1960, after John F. Kennedy narrowly defeated Richard Nixon, staunch Hollywood conservative John Wayne declared, “I didn’t vote for him, but he’s my president and I hope he does a good job.”

In 2008, after President Obama was elected, right-wing talk-radio host Rush Limbaugh declared, “I hope he fails.”

At The Daily Beast, we count ourselves in the John Wayne camp.

We were early, principled, and unapologetic opponents of Donald Trump’s divisive and demagogic campaign.

But if he is our next president, we will not question his legitimacy or hope he fails.

Instead, we will count ourselves members of the loyal opposition—loyal to the United States of America and opposed to the policies proposed by the president-elect during his campaign. And we will reflect on what has led so many of our fellow Americans to embrace such a messenger.

Read John’s entire column here.

From The Atlantic:

At 2 a.m. on Wednesday morning, once it became clear Donald Trump would be America’s next president, the conservative, anti-Trump, commentator Erick Erickson posted “An Open Letter to the Democrats.” He asked them not to rebuke Trump’s supporters. “Instead of condemning them and labeling them all bigots and racists and deplorables,” he wrote, “I hope you will try to relate to them, connect to them, and recognize their legitimate concerns.” Since Trump’s victory, other commentators have said similar things.

Sorry, but I disagree. Reconciliation is important. But not at the expense of truth.

Read the rest of Peter’s column here.

Continue reading

From The Atlantic:

I don’t respect this election result. I must abide by it, of course. But I don’t respect it. I respect the people who voted for Donald Trump. As private individuals, they’re no better or worse than anyone else. But I don’t respect their decision to elect a man who blames vulnerable minorities for America’s problems. Who threatens journalists for reporting the news. Who castigates judges for requiring him to abide by the rule of law. Who boasts about his enthusiasm for torture. Who cheers on his supporters on when they beat protesters. I don’t respect that. I won’t pretend the people possess infinite wisdom. I’m a Jew. We know better.

Read the rest of Peter’s column here.

Continue reading

From Time:

Donald Trump’s foreign policy? Still up in the air at this point. With Hillary Clinton, we would have known exactly what we were getting. That was her biggest selling point—and a big part of the problem. But Trump is the ultimate black box. Much of this was by design—making America great again was always about America itself, allies and enemies be damned. That makes for an effective political pitch, but it’s a wholly unrealistic governing philosophy for a person whose main responsibility is to navigate the country through choppy geopolitical waters.

Read Ian’s entire column here.

Continue reading

From The Atlantic:

The end of the campaign came for Donald Trump early Wednesday morning, but it was not the ending almost anyone foresaw.

It was victory.

He emerged at nearly 3 a.m. on a balcony overlooking the hotel ballroom where hundreds of his supporters had gathered, weary from hours of waiting but energized by the incredible, gradually dawning result. A throng of high heels and red caps, they cheered as he descended the ramp to the stage, trailed by his family and advisers.

Gripping the podium and squaring his shoulders, Trump praised his opponent—the one he had spent months deriding as a liar and a criminal—and called for the healing to begin. “Now it is time for America to bind the wounds of division—have to get together,” he said.

Read the rest of Molly’s column here.

Continue reading

Scroll to top