Month: November 2016

From Time:

It was unthinkable until it happened. On January 20, Donald J. Trump will take over as President of the United States. The impact of his coming presidency is just being felt in the U.S.—but the rest of the world will need to adjust to a President Trump as well. That won’t be easy—Trump campaigned on overturning some of the most basic assumptions about U.S. foreign policy, from the importance of multilateral alliances like NATO to the importance of keeping a strong front against a resurgent Russia.

So what will it be be like? What should the friends and enemies of the U.S. expect? In this video, TIME foreign affairs columnist Ian Bremmer offers a guide to a world change—Trump’s America in the world. It won’t be like you expect.

Watch Ian’s video here.

From The Atlantic:

“I saw quite a change,” said CBS’s Lesley Stahl after interviewing Donald Trump for 60 Minutes on Sunday. “He was much more subdued, much more serious.”

Really?

Consider Trump’s comments on abortion. “Are you looking to appoint a Justice who wants to overturn Roe v. Wade?” Stahl asked. Trump’s response: “I’m pro-life, the judges will be pro-life.”

With that statement, Trump casually blew up decades of conservative legal argument. For years, conservatives have excoriated liberals for supposedly imposing their personal moral views rather than interpreting the Constitution. But asked whether his Supreme Court justices would vote to overturn Roe v. Wade, Trump didn’t even feign interest in whether there’s a right to abortion in the Constitution. He said he’s against abortion personally and promised that his appointees would be too. Constitutional interpretation be damned.

Read the rest of Peter’s column here.

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From The Ringer:

Jon Favreau, Jon Lovett, and Tommy Vietor discuss the hiring of Stephen Bannon (5:05), President-elect Trump’s potential Cabinet (13:24), and President Obama’s role in the conversation after the election (29:50). The Guardian’s Sabrina Siddiqui joins to discuss how the press should cover Trump (40:05).

Listen to the entire episode here.

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From Vox:

Why did Hillary Clinton lose the election? Why did Donald Trump win it? And why was the polling so completely wrong?

No one digs deeper into the demographics, polls, and trends of modern American politics than the Atlantic’s Ron Brownstein. Though he didn’t predict Trump’s win, his pre-election writing explained exactly how it could — and eventually did — happen. And it’s a more complicated story than you’ve heard.

In the week since the election, much has been made of Trump’s strength among white working class voters — and properly so, as they were core to his victory. But the white working class wasn’t the primary cause of Clinton’s loss. Her real problem were groups that didn’t turn out for her in the numbers her campaign expected — college-educated whites, African-Americans, and millennials. And that suggests a very different future for the Democrats.

In this conversation, Brownstein goes through the math of the election in detail. We also talk about:

-What Clinton’s campaign assumed, wrongly, about winning the middle of the country.
-The two quotes that Brownstein thinks explain the entire election
-How much James Comey influenced the election’s outcome
-Why Trump was able to win the support of voters who thought him unqualified
-What might have happened if Democrats had chosen Bernie Sanders as their nominee.
-Whether the next Democratic nominee should be focused on winning back working-class whites or energizing the Obama coalition
-The worrying signs the Republican Party will see if it compares Trump’s win to Reagan’s wins
-Why Brownstein sees Trump as a political independent candidate who happened to run under the Republican banner (and why Ezra disagrees)
-What will be hard and easy for a Trump administration to do while working with a Republican Congress.

And much more. There’s a lot of confusion about this election. Brownstein is here to clear it up.

Listen to the entire episode here.

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From The Atlantic:

Why did Hillary Clinton lose last week’s presidential election? The candidate herself believes James Comey, the FBI director who notified Congress in an October 28 letter that he was reopening the inquiry into her private emails, was to blame. Her campaign, meanwhile, has cited “a host of uncontrollable headwinds,” asserting that her team did all they could in an unforeseeably difficult environment.

Many Democrats, however, are less forgiving of the campaign and its strategy. It may be true that the Comey letter shaved a crucial few points off Clinton’s vote in the home stretch. But critics believe a better campaign would have left her less exposed to a last-minute surprise. If not for a series of miscalculations, these critics contend, the Comey letter wouldn’t have had the impact it did—and she might be president-elect today.

Read Molly’s entire column here.

From CNN:

Michael Morell, the former acting director of the CIA, reflects on George W. Bush and Barack Obama after serving both presidents for years; shares his harrowing experience of being with President Bush on 9/11, and the subsequent decisions that he believes contributed to the invasion of Iraq; and what he sees as the most rapidly growing threat to America’s national security.

Listen to the entire episode here.

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From The Ringer:

Jon Favreau and Dan Pfeiffer talk about trusting the polls (4:00) and where we go from here (14:40). Then, they call Alyssa Mastromonaco of Vice Media to discuss her article “A Letter to Young Women: How We Will All Move Forward Together Now” (30:50) and how POTUS has handled himself (41:44).

Listen to the entire episode here.

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From The Daily Beast:

In 1960, after John F. Kennedy narrowly defeated Richard Nixon, staunch Hollywood conservative John Wayne declared, “I didn’t vote for him, but he’s my president and I hope he does a good job.”

In 2008, after President Obama was elected, right-wing talk-radio host Rush Limbaugh declared, “I hope he fails.”

At The Daily Beast, we count ourselves in the John Wayne camp.

We were early, principled, and unapologetic opponents of Donald Trump’s divisive and demagogic campaign.

But if he is our next president, we will not question his legitimacy or hope he fails.

Instead, we will count ourselves members of the loyal opposition—loyal to the United States of America and opposed to the policies proposed by the president-elect during his campaign. And we will reflect on what has led so many of our fellow Americans to embrace such a messenger.

Read John’s entire column here.

From The Atlantic:

At 2 a.m. on Wednesday morning, once it became clear Donald Trump would be America’s next president, the conservative, anti-Trump, commentator Erick Erickson posted “An Open Letter to the Democrats.” He asked them not to rebuke Trump’s supporters. “Instead of condemning them and labeling them all bigots and racists and deplorables,” he wrote, “I hope you will try to relate to them, connect to them, and recognize their legitimate concerns.” Since Trump’s victory, other commentators have said similar things.

Sorry, but I disagree. Reconciliation is important. But not at the expense of truth.

Read the rest of Peter’s column here.

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From The Atlantic:

I don’t respect this election result. I must abide by it, of course. But I don’t respect it. I respect the people who voted for Donald Trump. As private individuals, they’re no better or worse than anyone else. But I don’t respect their decision to elect a man who blames vulnerable minorities for America’s problems. Who threatens journalists for reporting the news. Who castigates judges for requiring him to abide by the rule of law. Who boasts about his enthusiasm for torture. Who cheers on his supporters on when they beat protesters. I don’t respect that. I won’t pretend the people possess infinite wisdom. I’m a Jew. We know better.

Read the rest of Peter’s column here.

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From Time:

Donald Trump’s foreign policy? Still up in the air at this point. With Hillary Clinton, we would have known exactly what we were getting. That was her biggest selling point—and a big part of the problem. But Trump is the ultimate black box. Much of this was by design—making America great again was always about America itself, allies and enemies be damned. That makes for an effective political pitch, but it’s a wholly unrealistic governing philosophy for a person whose main responsibility is to navigate the country through choppy geopolitical waters.

Read Ian’s entire column here.

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From The Atlantic:

The end of the campaign came for Donald Trump early Wednesday morning, but it was not the ending almost anyone foresaw.

It was victory.

He emerged at nearly 3 a.m. on a balcony overlooking the hotel ballroom where hundreds of his supporters had gathered, weary from hours of waiting but energized by the incredible, gradually dawning result. A throng of high heels and red caps, they cheered as he descended the ramp to the stage, trailed by his family and advisers.

Gripping the podium and squaring his shoulders, Trump praised his opponent—the one he had spent months deriding as a liar and a criminal—and called for the healing to begin. “Now it is time for America to bind the wounds of division—have to get together,” he said.

Read the rest of Molly’s column here.

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